Top 100 Ways To A Healthy Brain (pg 5)

Armis is a high-strategy board game, designed for brain-game enthusiasts.


The objective is simple -- capture your opponent's Flag, s

uccess is often achieved through good planning, astute situational assessment, and brilliant implementation.


Benefits of Playing Armis
  • Armis develops critical thinking skills,
  • Armis builds self-esteem, skills are certain and measurable, not conditioned on any financial, academic, or social class,
  • Armis inspires you to be inventive, 
  • Armis emboldens you to learn and understand complex matters easier and faster,
  • Armis spurs you to plan for and attain success, 
  • In a narrow way, some could say Armis furthers a scientific way of thinking -- you decide on a hypothesis, then you make your ‘move’ to test it. 
Please support our Kickstarter.com project to help educate children globally.


81.  Make a Mnemonic   

This is a creative way to remember lists. Mnemonic devices can take the form of acronyms (such as RICE to remember first-aid advice for injured limbs: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) or sentences (such as the classic “Every good boy does fine” to remember the musical notes E, G, B, D, and F on the lines of the treble clef).
www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/

 

82.  Get your beauty rest   When we rest and dream, memories are sifted through, some discarded, others consolidated and saved. When we don't sleep, a recent study found, proteins build up on synapses, possibly making it hard to think and learn new things.
timesofindia.indiatimes.com

83.  Tease your Brain 
Whether crossword puzzles, sudokus and other brain teasers actually keep your brain in shape, has not been well-established. However, lack of education is a strong predictor of cognitive decline. The more you've tried to learn, the better you'll be at mental sit-ups in old age.
timesofindia.indiatimes.com
 

84.  Use your Non-dominant hand 

Tackling new tasks improves brain capacity in younger people and has a restorative effect on mental faculties that are declining. Boost your brain power right now by performing everyday activities with your non-dominant hand. If you're right-handed, use your left hand to eat, drink, comb your hair, and brush your teeth. Try writing your name with your non-dominant hand or put your mouse pad on the other side of the keyboard. By exercising your brain through the use of non-dominant hand, you are stimulating the opposite side of the brain and activating blood flow, which slows down the brain aging process and improves mental capacity
health.yahoo.net

 

85.  Move your Fingers to Improve your Brain 

Many people marvel that Asian children seem so intelligent. It could be because they use their fingers more frequently. They eat with chopsticks and at one time, they used to compute with an abacus in school. Why does this work? A map of the brain shows that the nerve endings on your fingertips correspond to more areas of the brain than any other body area, except perhaps the tongue and lips. Therefore, finger exercise and movements can be useful in stimulating the neurons in the brain.

 

86.  Stimulate brain acuity with self-massage

To improve concentration and memory try this self-massage that stimulates two easy-to-find acupressure points on your neck at the base of the skull. Cross your hands behind you with the palms cradling the back of your head, your thumbs in the grooves on each side of your neck, and your index fingers crossing one another below the skull, just above the thumbs. Sit in a chair, lean your head back, and let it rest against the pressure of your thumbs and index fingers. Slowly inhale deeply through your nose and exhale through your mouth, letting your whole body relax. Do this for three to five minutes. You'll increase blood flow to the brain and at the same time relax the neck muscles, which often tense up in response to stress, constricting blood vessels in the area.
health.yahoo.net

 

87.  Expand your Vocabulary  

A strong vocabulary is one of the best indicators of intelligence.  Sign up for a service like Vocab Vitamins for a word a day newsletter.  You can then practice working the new words you learn into everyday conversations.  This will keep you mentally active and thinking.


mysuperchargedlife.com

 

88.  Learn to play a Musical Instrument 

Not a lead singer?  Then you might try out for the band instead.  Learning to play an instrument can be challenging.  This makes the perfect exercise for your brain.  You want to be challenged.  Push your mind and discover how much it still has to offer you.
mysuperchargedlife.com

 

89.  Memorize Poetry and Wisdom Literature

Memorize and recite a love poem to your significant other.  They’ll love you for it and so will your brain.  Of course, if poetry isn’t your thang, then you can always memorize passages from classic wisdom literature or your favorite joke book!  Suit yourself.
mysuperchargedlife.com

 

90.  Assemble Bikes, Toys and Furniture. 

As the man of the house, I often find myself putting together all kinds of things.  These projects are great exercise for the brain.  You know what I mean.  It is like a giant puzzle with a million tiny parts.  Don’t worry if you have a couple of leftovers.  That always happens to me too!
mysuperchargedlife.com

91.  Study a Foreign Language  

Developing new language skills is a great workout for the mind.  Plus, bilingual people are in demand in many professions.  Learning to speak another language might not only help your brain, but it could benefit your bank account too!
mysuperchargedlife.com

 

92.  Practice "awake sleeping" or reflection 

This is another way to allow the brain to find the new connections you're looking for. Find a few times a day when you can turn off anything that electronically gets a hold of you and simply reflect on what your needs are and how things are going. Be open to the ideas that come flooding into the canals of your mind
www.entrepreneur.com

 

93.  Get organized  

You're more likely to forget things if your home is cluttered and your notes are in disarray. Jot down tasks, appointments and other events in a special notebook or calendar. You might even repeat each entry out loud as you write it down to help cement it in your memory. Keep to-do lists current, and check off items you've completed. Set aside a certain place for your wallet, keys and other essentials.
www.mayoclinic.com

 

94.  Be contented on what you have 

Be happy with whatever you have. Don’t worry with what other have got. If you worry about what others have then you will never be happy and if you are not happy, your mind will not be healthy. If your mind does not have a buoyant spirit then you will physically be unfit. Always remember that what you have got others doesn’t have and keep your self-happy.
www.articlesbase.com

 

95.  Check your Iron  

Taking iron supplements could increase brain power for iron-deficient women, according to a 2007 study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Results showed that after 16 weeks of treatment for iron deficiency, participants performed five to seven times better on cognitive tasks.
Low iron -- the most common nutritional deficiency in the United States -- typically triggers symptoms such as fatigue and a decrease in work performance. But overloading on iron can lead to organ damage, cautions

Wholeliving.com

 

96.  Spice Things Up   Turmeric does more than add flavor to curry dishes. Curcumin, one of the compounds in this spice, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Some early research has linked it to a lower risk of cognitive decline. Preliminary animal studies suggest it may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, a condition that's rarer in India, where curry is a staple. Add turmeric to food regularly or mix 1/2 teaspoon with hot water and sip as a tea.
Wholeliving.com

 

97.  Garden  

Reach your hands into the earth and plant some herbs and flowers. Gardening is a great multisensory experience, as you feel the soil, hear nature and the neighborhood around you, taste herbs you've grown, and appreciate the color and beauty of the flowers you nurtured.
oedb.org/library/college-basics

 

98.  Explore the World    
One more great excuse to book that flight to Brazil (or whatever exotic country calls your name): Immersing yourself in a foreign culture can enhance creative thinking. Research has shown that people who live abroad are better at creative tasks such as drawing, writing and problem solving. "Outside their cultural context, they're forced to relearn the meaning of simple things," says study author William W. Maddux, Ph.D., assistant professor of organizational behavior at Insead, a business school in Fountainbleu, France. For example, leaving food on your plate may be an insult in the United States, but it's polite in China. "The ability to look at things from multiple and different perspectives leads us to increased creativity, possibly by changing how the brain is wired," Maddux says. If living abroad isn't an option, learning a new language or becoming an expert on a foreign cuisine may strike that spark for you.

 shine.yahoo.com

99.  Fix your Homocysteine

Many Americans are vitamin deficient. We are the most overfed and undernourished country in the world. The meat, sugar, alcohol, coffee and cigarettes we consume in excess all deplete us of critical B vitamins that are needed to keep us healthy. Without adequate amounts of folate, B6 and B12 we are at increased risk for Alzheimer’s, dementia, Parkinson’s, and depression, not to mention heart attacks, strokes, breast, colon, cervical, lung and prostate cancer. If that isn’t enough, women deficient in folate before or during pregnancy are more likely to give birth to children with spinal cord defects and Down’s syndrome. One recent study found those with the highest homocysteine had twice the risk of getting dementia and Alzheimer’s. Thankfully, you can easily fix this.

 www.ultraprevention.com

100.  Divide and Conquer   

Juggling multiple tasks may seem productive, but the quality of your work could suffer. "The prefrontal cortex, a region critical to processing info, is optimally designed to do one thing at a time," explains Adam Gazzaley, M.D., director of the neuroscience imaging center at the University of California at San Francisco. "Think of it as the bouncer at the nightclub of your brain: He's paid to let in one guest at a time. If they rush the door, things get chaotic." Dr. Gazzaley suggests that when something requires high performance and focus, shut out distractions. Log out of social-networking sites and email, and turn off your phone. Once you've aced the task, feel free to share your success with friends.
www.self.com

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